Archive for Books

Leslie Scalapino with Michael Cross – Interview & Essay

This book is also available as part of the 2019-2020 press subscription (see here for details).

Edited and introduced by Michael Cross, this book features an interview Cross conducted with Leslie Scalapino from 2007-2010, as well as Scalapino’s “Poetics” essay, both published here for the first time. 62 pages, side stapled. Cover art by Amy Evans McClure. Covers RISO printed by Aaron Cohick.

From Michael Cross’s introduction to this volume:

I first worked up the courage to propose a long-form interview to Leslie Scalapino in September of 2006. By then, I had spent most of my early writing life obsessed with her project. Her work was the first to genuinely illustrate for me what poetry is and what it can ultimately do, and ever since that first glance into that they were at the beach—which I discovered by chance as an undergraduate—I spent much of my free time attempting to apprentice myself to her. As a graduate student at Mills College in the early aughts, I spent hours obsessively scanning the shelves of an all-but-forgotten warehouse in San Leandro called Gray Wolf Books, which I’d discovered was a treasure-trove of Bay Area Language writing, including shelves of abandoned and out-of-print O Books. I sent a letter to the publisher’s address on the back of those books, and incredibly, Scalapino herself answered with the generosity that defined her among younger poets.

From the interview:

Cross: How would you characterize the “event” of the poem, then? Are you saying that the poem is also interdependent with other occurrences—that writing as an activity in the world is no different than other activities, and, as such, cannot operate as a privileged mode of thinking? And if so, why write poetry specifically? In my understanding, your writing deactivates occurrence—it makes hierarchies of power, significance, and difference inoperative, and as such, works next to this interdependence as a mode of self-reflexivity (which, I suppose, privileges the writing by pushing it outside the act of leveling). In other words, does writing level occurrence in your practice by making all events interdependent (that is, does the thinking and writing actually perform this task?), or is the writing always already simply another occurrence in a web of happenings—a record of simultaneity? Does the writing somehow transcend this leveling in the act of attention (imagining the rim), by reflecting on this “lawlessness” in real time, next to it? Is it that there’s no site of occurrence or that there’s no privileged site of occurrence because everything is always evental in nature, is always touching? [24 october 2007]

Scalapino: You give a multitude of possibilities—I like all of them to be in operation at once. Even if they are conflicting they are questions in the mind and the response of the reader, not needing to cancel each other but jostling. However, I don’t understand the question: [my view apparently being] “that writing as an activity in the world is no different than other activities, and, as such, cannot operate as a privileged mode of thinking? And if so, why write poetry specifically?” My answer: there’s occurrence that can only be as the poem, it’s a mental activity that’s a space and relation that doesn’t exist otherwise, in the world. It is not that poetry “is no different than other activities” (though I may have said that, I meant:) it’s that it is also activity—so, mind and action are not separate in the sense of mind being weak and ineffective in the face of ‘real’ action (the motions of history predominate and the individual mind is nothing, without power—minds are also making those motions? those that are the history). Anyway, throughout my writing it’s a problem I’m working on, I don’t have an answer or fixed view: it’s like I’m trying to find out, differently, in individual works.

Norma Cole – Drawings

Now available! You can also subscribe to our 2019-2020 season and receive the book, plus lots else (see here for details).

Early next year, we’ll launch Norma Cole’s DRAWINGS, an art book featuring over 60 notebook sketches and drawings, often incorporating collage elements. It should come as no surprise that we’ve been fans of Norma’s visual work for awhile, and we can’t wait to put this book in people’s hands.

Forthcoming in early 2020. Introduced by Mary Ann Caws. Photo credits Steven Seidenberg. 96 pages, full color throughout.

The notebooks are piled up, the sparse texts say much without spelling it out; something about being or not saying sorry. Here is the thing: as a reader-viewer, I appreciate the possibility of making my own sense of the given and hidden, allowing my feeling of the story to take me in, without re-reading to check…

Mary Ann Caws, from the Introduction

For more on Norma Cole’s visual art and notebook practice, see Claire Tranchino’s discussion of her work with the Norma Cole Collection at the Poetry Collection in Buffalo. And if you haven’t read this lovely exhibition report by Laura Moriarty, you’re missing out. If memory serves, we walked straight from Norma’s show (at Margaret Tedesco’s 2nd Floor Projects in 2015) to a lunch with Norma where we were so ecstatic we proposed to do an art book!

Mayer & Browne – COMPLETE WORKS OF APIS MELLIFERA

ABOUT THE WORD DIVINATION

The furtive fig does figure like a fiction
INTO THE PIZZAS OF futurity, but it’s a non-fiction fig!
going well with fungi & gorgonzola
& a figment of lovage & fiddlehead ferns
                         a fraction of
there’s something fishy in Denmark
in the fiduciary field, i tend to fidget
i think i have fibromyalgia or something
so i take Flomax 2c a day to find my savior
but i’m sorry to say, we have no finch sock
this calendar year, which is the field
guide to the fancy of my fortune

Collum & Robinson – DOT’S DINER

Dot’s Diner

“We get a seat in a booth. All the waitresses know Jack. None of them know me. As a matter of fact, all the cooks know Jack too.

We sit. We gossip. We talk about poetry.

I like thinking of Jack saying, ‘I was reading ______’ s poems and enjoying the hell out of them.’

We eat. I always (always) get a short stack of blueberry pancakes and a side of bacon. Tea. Jack gets coffee, and sometimes bacon. Usually eggs. Some kind of bread. He makes a sandwich with biscuit, butter, bacon, and jelly. I like remembering him scooping butter from the pat onto a knife and then straight into his mouth.

Sometimes we look at the art on the walls. Sometimes a fellow birdwatcher stops by the table to chat about birds with Jack. Sometimes I go into the Dot’s Diner bathroom and wonder why it has two toilets, not in stalls, side by side.

Then Jack reaches for the plastic bag and raises his eyebrows, smiles. ‘Shall we write some poems?’

Yes, we shall. We make up the rules for the writing of two poems and then trade the pads back and forth until each person’s page is more or less full. Jack doesn’t know this, but I usually take the west- facing side of the booth so that I can look out at the mountains while we write.”—Elizabeth Robinson

Featuring letters and facsimile reproductions of the typescript.

Read an excerpt here.

84 pages | List price, $12.95 | ISBN: 978-0-989-31327-8

ATTN: Issue 2 (non-subscription price)

ATTN: is an event-based journal. Twice a year, we ask poets to document whatever it is that has their attention on a particular day (poems, notes, sketches, collage, reviews, screen grabs, etc). Work is done on 8.5 x 11″ sheets, then mailed to the FOBW press address. Covers are letter pressed, and all contributions are xeroxed and included as is. Each issue documents communities of attention in their moment of attention.

The second issue was guest edited by Tongo Eisen-Martin, erica lewis, and Tyrone Williams on April 25, 2016. It features a letterpress cover by Tyrone Williams, and contributions from Eric Amling, Nadia Bourne, Timothy Bradford (w/Crag Hill, J.L. Jacobs, & Chad Reynolds), Dan Brady, Sarah B. Boyle, Chase Public Collective, Elana Chavez, Cris Cheek, Allison Cobb, Donna de la Perrière, Craig Dworkin, Gloria Frym, Kim D. Hunter, Megan Kaminski, Mhadu Kaza, Caroline Knapp, Yasmine Lancaster, Susan Landers, Joyce Lee, erica lewis, Svati Lelyveld, Anthony McCann, Melissa Mack, Mark Mendoza, David James Miller, Aida Mukharesh (w/Alaa & Brandon), A.L. Nielsen, K. Renzi, Michael Rerick, Mg Roberts & William Poole, Raquel Salas-Rivera, Sarah Sarai, Syd Staiti, Rob Stanton, Rebecca Stoddard, Sam Truitt, Chris Vitiello, Brad Vogler, Joshua Ware, Eryk Wenziak, and Annie Won.

For a discount on the cover price, subscribe to ATTN: here or here.

Carter Smith – ROUNDS

Carter Smith’s first full length collection of poetry is a typewriter book, first published serially in 20 letter pressed envelopes, mailed two per week. Deluxe subscribers received the serial edition over a period of 10 weeks (sold out): one loose-leaf poem per envelope, Smith’s Rounds moves as incrementally as it arrived. Trade edition featuring letter pressed covers, with cover typewriter art by Anni Albers.

Read an excerpt here.

320 pages | List price, $18.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9893132-5-4

 

josé felipe alvergue – GIST : RIFT : DRIFT : BLOOM

gist : rift : drift : bloom josé felipe alvergue ISBN: 9780989313230 Price: $17.95

gist : rift : drift : bloom
josé felipe alvergue
ISBN: 9780989313230
Price: $17.95

Environmental Studies. Alvergue’s second full-length collection of poetry is an eco-historical meditation on the relationship between landscape and language. GIST : RIFT : DRIFT : BLOOM was composed between Buffalo, New York and Eau Claire, Wisconsin. As a sort of interstice, definitions give pause to the continued evolution of language in the poetry, where a word is planted early. Compressed by language, or carried off by sketches and through space, these words bloom elsewhere.

josé felipe alvergue is a graduate of both the Calarts Writing (MFA) and Buffalo Poetics (PhD) programs. He is the author of precis (2015, a finalist Bob Kaufman Prize), and us look up/ there red dwells (2008), and his work has appeared in Apogee, Kadar Koli, TAB: The Journal of Poetry and Poetics, P-Queue, Nocturnes, and Black Clock, among others venues. josé lives in Wisconsin, where he is an Assistant Professor of American and Transnational Literature at the University of Wisconsin—Eau Claire.

Jean Donnelly – Green Oil

Green Oil Jean Donnelly ISBN: 9780989313223 Price: $15.95

Green Oil
Jean Donnelly
ISBN: 9780989313223
Price: $15.95

Read an excerpt from this book.

Read a review of this book:
Maureen Thorson @ Open Letters Monthly

The poems in GREEN OIL begin in a procedure that sidesteps pronouncement as the poet’s role, in favor of a kind of listening that allows for accident to open onto new understandings of language and making meaning. Donnelly begins by performing “liberal homophonic readings and orthographical transcriptions of poems in French from the collectionPièces by the poet Francis Ponge.” However, Donnelly listens beyond the procedure itself and hears, “at the threshold of the material traces of Ponge’s poems, […] the cadence of something not [her] own.”

Author City: EXETER, NH USA

Jean Donnelly is the author of GREEN OIL (Further Other Book Works, 2014), the julia set(Edge Books), and ANTHEM, selected by Charles Bernstein for the National Poetry Series and published by Sun & Moon. She studied poetry at the creative writing program at George Mason University, where she co-founded So To Speak: A Feminist Journal of Language & Art, and co-curated the In Your Ear reading series at the District of Columbia Arts Center. Donnelly lives in Exeter, New Hampshire, with her children.

 

Campbell – We Used to Be Generals

Sarah Campbell WE USED TO BE GENERALS ISBN: 9780989313216 Price: $12.95 "The compact, often uncannily startling poems in Sarah Campbell's WE USED TO BE GENERALS are precisely composed language acts set at cocked angles. Sudden as aphorisms, they unsteady the mind in order to open it to myriad particular yet paradoxical shock-effects in our persistently contemporary world."—Susan Howe Sarah Campbell's other books include Everything We Could Ask For (2010) and The Maximum (2008). Her literary criticism has appeared in Jacket 2, Arizona Quarterly, and The Golden Handcuffs Review. Radio pieces have aired on WNYC, WBFO, and as podcasts for the Poetry Foundation. She lives in New York.

Sarah Campbell
WE USED TO BE GENERALS
ISBN: 9780989313216
Price: $12.95

Read a sample from this book.

Read reviews and an interview:
Rob Stanton’s review on Jacket2
rob mclennan’s blog
Interview @ rob mclennan’s blog

“The compact, often uncannily startling poems in Sarah Campbell’s WE USED TO BE GENERALS are precisely composed language acts set at cocked angles. Sudden as aphorisms, they unsteady the mind in order to open it to myriad particular yet paradoxical shock-effects in our persistently contemporary world.”—Susan Howe

“Each turn of phrase is a phrase turned in on itself, on ourselves; we are apart from the throng, but a part of it. These stunning, terse poems, ‘like small incendiary device[s],’ threaten to explode our dearly-held notions of individuality and community, making room for a world in which we are allowed to say, and mean, and perhaps even be, two things at once.”—Sasha Steensen

“Every word herein is detail. Every detail is the whole. ‘Enough was never enough’—& our attention is maintained at a point of intense energy & acutely skilled quiet. I read this book & when I went to bed that night I read the afterimages of Campbell’s poems inside my eyes.”—Pattie McCarthy

Sarah Campbell’s other books include Everything We Could Ask For (2010) and The Maximum(2008). Her literary criticism has appeared in Jacket 2, Arizona Quarterly, and The Golden Handcuffs Review. Radio pieces have aired on WNYC, WBFO, and as podcasts for the Poetry Foundation. She lives in New York.

 

Broadside: Maureen Owen, Janet Hamill, and Jane Dalrymple-Hollo

 

Owen - Hamill - Dalrymple-Hollo

 

 

Produced for a reading at Mountain Fold Books in Colorado Springs, this ephemera piece features two double-sided broadsides housed in a signed folder. With letter pressed poems by Maureen Owen and Janet Hamill (recto), and a four-paneled painting by Jane Dalrymple-Hollo printed inkjet (verso). Signed by both poets and the artist.

Machado – ROUTE: MARIENBAD

I SLEEP AND WAKE AND SLEEP AND WAKE AND THIS IS PROSODY.

Route: Marienbad presents prosody itself as a receptive state, shaped by the activity of an attuned mind in sleep, and the interaction of the sleeping (or sleepless) body with whatever murmuring space it occupies–as of the mind waking (when, as she writes, “The sleep is going away to a corner of the system so it can be awake”).

C.J. Martin – UNDER WATER

Two propositions on relation:

For what you say to me is not finished within my thought or memory, but you grow there and change, the way a shadow extends as light passes over it in Akashic emptiness.

You grow through what I have to say to you, as a tree grows up through space, then what I have to say changes.

That’s why we need the identity of our physical forms.

–Mei-Mei Berrsenbrugge, “Glitter”

One of you is gone, but the relationship isn’t over.

– 2nd-hand grief advice from Andrew Rippeon

ATTN: Issue 1 (non-subscription price)

ATTN: Issue 1ATTN: is an event-based journal. Twice a year, we ask poets to document whatever it is that has their attention on a particular day (poems, notes, sketches, collage, reviews, screen grabs, etc). Work is done on 8.5 x 11″ sheets, then mailed to the FOBW press address. Covers are letter pressed & laser printed, and all contributions are xeroxed and included as is. Each issue documents communities of attention in their moment of attention.

The first issue features contributions from Amanda Ackerman, Harold Abramowitz, Will Alexander, Kimberly Alidio, Andrea Beltran, Sarah Campbell, Jessica Ceballos, Chen Chen, Ching-In Chen, Chiwan Choi, Norma Cole, Allison Noelle Conner, Beverly Dahlen, Janet E. Dandridge, Michelle Detorie, Spencer Dobbs, Thom Donovan, Julia Drescher, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Esperanza, Susan Gevirtz, Robert Glück, Whit Griffin, Donald Guravich, Rob Halpern, Jen Hofer, Brenda Iijima, Bhanu Kapil, John Keene, Gelare Khoshgozaran, Kim Koga, Joanne Kyger, Sueyeun Juliette Lee, Aditi Machado, C.J. Martin, Farid Matuk, Cassie Nicholson, Connor Nicholson, Duncan Nicholson, Maximo Spinoza Ontiveros, Maryam Parhizkar, Kristin Prevallet, Andrea Quaid, Eléna Rivera, Carlos Soto Román, Jocelyn Saidenberg, Ash Smith, Margaret Tedesco, Shannon Tharp, Anne Waldman, Alli Warren, and Jane Wong.

For a discount on the cover price, subscribe to ATTN: here or here.

Klinger – Rubble Paper, Paper Rubble

Paul Klinger RUBBLE PAPER, PAPER RUBBLE ISBN: 9780989313209 Price: $24.95

Paul Klinger
RUBBLE PAPER, PAPER RUBBLE
ISBN: 9780989313209
Price: $24.95

Read a sample from this book

Read reviews and an interview with the author:
Rob Mclennan @ Rob Mclennan’s blog
interview @ rob mclennan’s blog

“Tracing the development of Paul Klinger’s work over the past decade (the many handmade/altered chapbooks collected in the Dusie catalog), one sees emerge a type of collage that, rather than being predicated solely on urban or commercial/mediated excess (a printed skin, as in the early collage works of the Modernists)—models a poetics analogued on the animality of reptile skin—the creature archive that intersects with pre/history, with spectral extinction, and with the conflicting memorials of settlement. For certainly Klinger’s work is both a study in surfaces and creature-based constraint—a method which acts to expand presences in the room—and one wherein gaps in the rational, and on the page, come to signal those presences kept at the margins of the archive. Unlike the dynastic scribes of China who were charged with making sculptural rubbings as a way of transmitting official Imperial narratives, Klinger’s treatment of the historical markers of Texas (which tilts toward the coast) works reverse colonially—an anti-extinction sieve—to reveal & preserve presences (like the alligator it takes for its mascot) overprinted in conquest. As the rubbings themselves add an extra dimensional texture to the page, RUBBLE PAPER, PAPER RUBBLE presents a memorial dimension outside of official transmission. In this sense, Klinger’s work represents not only an expansion of the archive of place but a break-out of presences from what seemed so set in stone.”—Ash Smith

“RUBBLE PAPER, PAPER RUBBLE was composed by visiting historical markers throughout southeast Texas and making graphite rubbings from the embossed text. At its heart, the project uses poetry to make and unmake official local histories. The book also contains color plates featuring a series of alligator prints I made while in the field, and another alligator print is featured on the cover. These are prints made directly from the animal’s body, a kind of swamp treatment of gyotaku printing. The rubbings are visual poems and landscapes that explore the musicality of the outside archive. While tracing the map of state historical markers to chart an itinerary, I started building strands of meaning in the markers I sought out. Transportation itself factored into the structure of the book. It’s a ‘roadside’ book that captures voices only as they are passing through and attempts, out of that eavesdropping, to create a grammar of place.”—Paul Klinger

Author City: HOUSTON, TX USA

Paul Klinger grew up around alligators in RWJ Airpark, just outside of Baytown, Texas. He received his MFA from the University of Arizona and his JD from the University of Houston. He has published several chapbooks as a member of the Dusie Poetry Kollectiv. At present, Klinger works as an attorney practicing maritime law in Houston, Texas. He enjoys assisting his wife, Dawn Pendergast, with production of hand-sewn chapbooks for the LRL Textile Series. He is the author of RUBBLE PAPER, PAPER RUBBLE (Further Other Book Works, 2013).

ATTN: Journal Subscription 2015

ATTN: is published twice a year (sometimes more). Edition size is 200 copies, some of which are reserved for contributors. Letter pressed cover, laser printed guts. Loads of contributors. See the ATTN: home page for details.

Subscribers get a discount on the cover price, as well as any additional issues released during the calendar year (money & time permitting). You can also subscribe to the journal + supplements hereIndividual issues are for sale on the shop page.

attn_header_issue1

Donnelly’s Green Oil + Print

Donnelly - Drescher - Green Oil

Get Jean Donnelly’s Green Oil with the limited edition broadside from our fundraiser for that book!

The broadside measures 5.25” x 10” and features an inkjet print of the cover art from the book, a collage by Julia Drescher entitled “Sermon I,” as well as a passage from the book hand written in graphite by Jean Donnelly. Produced in a variable edition of 55 signed and numbered copies, this broadside was printed on handmade Twinrocker Rotunda.

 


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